Sales

Nasty Networker – “Vomitous from the mouth”

This is a great article by a friend of mine – Recently I asked my network through LinkedIn: “What are the visible attributes of a ‘Nasty Networker?’” I’ve boiled the answers down into some common categories ranked by the frequency of their appearance Signs of a Nasty Networker Selfish. Not interested in helping others. Doesn’t ask questions. Talks too much. Bashes or otherwise acts inappropriately towards competitors. Uses high pressure and other bad sales techniques. Abuses contact information. Sends spam and other unwanted communication. Ignores business card etiquette. Social climber. Always looking for somebody better to talk to. Not open. Naive and needs education (about proper networking). More interested in the quantity of connections, not their quality. Disrespectful. In the end I think that “Nasty Networking” is driven primarily by either naivete or desperation. I saw a quote recently that suggested that the selfish type of taker networking is not[…]

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web site hurting your sales effort?

by Pete Monfre When many companies talk about marketing, they inevitably end up focusing myopically on their company web site.  Do a search in any search engine for “marketing” and the vast majority of topics will be on-line marketing. It’s as if the web has become the singular representation of  of marketing and sales tactics. While your web site is important, it is a mistake to consider it as the only factor in reaching prospects and converting them to customers. For most companies the web is a critical focal point during the early stages of your sales process for prospects. The trouble arises when the we attempt to make the site everything to everyone. I’m not saying there are many different uses for a corporate web site (service, support, education, social interaction, etc.) but most of my clients expect their site to primarily help drive sales. Whatever you are trying[…]

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What do customers really want?

I’m going to go out on a limb here and suggest that your customers don’t really care about the latest whiz-bang feature of your new whatchamathingy. I’m also willing to bet they don’t really care that much about how big you are, how small you are, how nice your office is, what your vision or mission might be or how awesome your last ad campaign was. Over the course of doing many surveys and focus groups with executives and physicians, one thing has been absolutely consistent. Customers want you to solve their problems. This could mean reducing costs or hassles (which usually incur added costs) or increasing revenue. But promising these broad concepts isn’t good enough. You need to understand your prospect’s and customer’s problems on a case-by-case basis. And you need to be up front about whether you can truly solve these problems. For some of you, this might[…]

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The Way Not To Sell

I got this email today. It’s important that you know I’ve never talked to this person. I have heard of the company (who’s name has been changed because I’m feeling charitable at the moment) but this was sent to me cold. I’ve added my comments. The original email is in yellow. (I’m just sharing this with you – I didn’t respond to the email. Yet.) And, before you comment, yes, I’m a big jerk. Dear Pete, Thank you very much for the opportunity to speak with you regarding Acme Business Services. I haven’t given him the opportunity – I’ve never spoke to him or heard of him. Nice trick though. I’m happy to introduce myself as the Regional Director of Business Development for your area. Good for you. I’m glad you are happy. Do you want a cookie? I have been serving the market research industry for over a decade[…]

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The Magic Marketing Bullet – revealed

For years now I’ve kept this highly guarded secret to myself because I didn’t want to let clients in on something that would surely render me useless to them. It’s not like I haven’t been asked a thousand times to reveal this secret – it comes up all the time in various forms but the essence of the question sounds like “What is The Magic Bullet marketing thing I can do to instantly transform my business into a customer acquisition powerhouse?” I know it is selfish of me to keep this magic to myself – after all, a guy’s got to eat and pay the rent. A client who knew this sacred information would know how easy it is to dominate competition and grow their customer list and that doesn’t make economic sense for the marketing and advertising industry. In fact, the Industry has kept this information locked up in[…]

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Chinks in the armor

I hate buying stuff. It’s like I have to be some kind of Sherlock Holmes to select a vendor and not get burned. Sometimes it’s easy to eliminate the jokers – they show up unprepared, don’t listen, and generally talk their way out of a sale. Others are not so easy. They say the right things, offer up gleaming case studies, have good sales skills, polished shoes and generally seem like a good option. The trouble is that usually there are several companies who have very similar capabilities and good sales pitches. How do I make the right decision? Most business buyers experience similar things when going through a selection process. Their process is typically not one of inclusion. Instead it is a process of elimination – evaluating tangible information and leveraging intuition to determine who makes the short list and who doesn’t. You might think they are hanging on[…]

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