customer buying habits

The Consultant’s Dirty Little Secret

A wise man by the name of Ed Schwarzkopf once said “People view consultants as guys that know fifty different ways to make love but don’t have a girlfriend”. I’m going to use bad language in this video. Specifically the word “Consultant”.

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Why Do People Buy – Part Two

So what does all this mean to marketers? (See Part One) 1. Advertising and marketing strategies should attempt to present an appeal strong enough to stimulate action toward satisfying one of Maslow’s basic human needs. 2. Maslow believes lower levels always take priority over higher levels so you shouldn’t attempt to sell products or services that only meet higher levels of need. This means don’t try and sell clothing to someone who hasn’t eaten in a week, and don’t sell expensive software to people who don’t have the basic infrastructure to run it.

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Why Do People Buy – Part One.

As marketers, we are constantly trying to anticipate every objection a potential customer might have about buying our products and services. It seems that if we could identify and address each of these objections and formulate a solution to each, we should be able to get them to buy almost anything. However the reality is very different and unpredictable. Advertising and marketing strategies based on logic rarely do as well as strategies based on an understanding of people’s emotions, desires and needs. In fact, in my experience, you will only get the results you desire by appealing to both the logic AND emotional needs of customers.

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What do customers really want?

I’m going to go out on a limb here and suggest that your customers don’t really care about the latest whiz-bang feature of your new whatchamathingy. I’m also willing to bet they don’t really care that much about how big you are, how small you are, how nice your office is, what your vision or mission might be or how awesome your last ad campaign was. Over the course of doing many surveys and focus groups with executives and physicians, one thing has been absolutely consistent. Customers want you to solve their problems. This could mean reducing costs or hassles (which usually incur added costs) or increasing revenue. But promising these broad concepts isn’t good enough. You need to understand your prospect’s and customer’s problems on a case-by-case basis. And you need to be up front about whether you can truly solve these problems. For some of you, this might[…]

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