business development

5 Red Flags That Show Your Sales Process Sucks

After 30 years of working with clients to solve problems that are killing their revenues and profits, I’ve identified a number of red flags that tell me loud and clear something is wrong with how that client is selling. The good news it isn’t hard to fix.

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Rule #4 of Marketing: Persistence

I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard people say “We mailed a brochure one time and we didn’t get a single lead. That’s why we don’t mail anything anymore.” These otherwise talented individuals are breaking the law of persistence. Think about it: there is a person out there who needs your product or service and you need to reach them to get your marketing message through and, with luck get on the short list. But you have no idea when this need will become active. The rule of Persistence is key. Today’s buyer is bombarded with marketing messages and they’ve put up a wall to keep you out. They delete email without looking at it. They don’t read ads. They have gatekeepers. You are one of thousands of companies vying for this buyer’s attention. If the old adage is that it takes seven contacts to make a sale[…]

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Rule #1 of Marketing: Simplicity

Marketing success comes down to one thing: knowing the rules of the game. Think about that for a minute. Let it swirl around in your brain. Seems like common sense, right? You can’t win a game if you don’t know the rules. Over the last couple of decades of creating successful marketing initiatives, I’ve discovered some hard scrabble rules. Violate them at your own risk. For some, this might be new information – for other experienced marketers, I hope the rules coming over the next few weeks are a refresher course in fundamentals. After you read them, if you disagree, feel fired up with renewed vigor, or are just lonely, feel free to comment. 1. The Rule of Simplicity When it comes to effective marketing communication, simplicity is key. The more precise you can be in communicating your value, the easier it is to buy from you.

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I hate the color blue.

Eliminating Personal Preferences in the communications development process. By Pete Monfre Evaluating creative work is one of the most difficult processes anyone faces when executing a marketing or communications strategy. The pressure comes from the fact that these decisions can make the difference between the success and failure of an entire effort. It’s not that we don’t all have opinions to contribute, but often those opinions are steeped in the fear of the unknown. Falling into this trap forces us to base decisions on the one thing we do know for sure:  our own personal preferences.

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A life without risk is a life without growth.

Looking back over the years I can see that my path has been what one might call “the road less traveled”. For me, risk and reward are inexorably linked and I have never worried about the possible consequences of zigging where most people zag. Of course this is the mindset of an invincible young man. As I grow, uh…, more mature, I can see that the risk I took so effortlessly was far more than I needed to shoulder. This was because I never thought about having a plan – I just jumped from the cliff and figured I’d know how to build my wings at some point before I hit the ground. Luckily for me, those wings somehow were constructed and the sudden stop at the bottom of my flight was avoided. Managing risk takes a four letter word.

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Nasty Networker – “Vomitous from the mouth”

This is a great article by a friend of mine – Recently I asked my network through LinkedIn: “What are the visible attributes of a ‘Nasty Networker?’” I’ve boiled the answers down into some common categories ranked by the frequency of their appearance Signs of a Nasty Networker Selfish. Not interested in helping others. Doesn’t ask questions. Talks too much. Bashes or otherwise acts inappropriately towards competitors. Uses high pressure and other bad sales techniques. Abuses contact information. Sends spam and other unwanted communication. Ignores business card etiquette. Social climber. Always looking for somebody better to talk to. Not open. Naive and needs education (about proper networking). More interested in the quantity of connections, not their quality. Disrespectful. In the end I think that “Nasty Networking” is driven primarily by either naivete or desperation. I saw a quote recently that suggested that the selfish type of taker networking is not[…]

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